Our Show

There are enough wrestling podcasts today rehashing the week to week shows and tearing them apart.  We want to provide a place for people to discuss the best and worst moments from wrestling’s past while also speculating on its future.  Here’s Mark’s take:

I was in the den at my Aunt Mae’s house. The grownups were talking and my sister was playing by herself. It was June 13th, 1985 (full disclosure, I googled that date). A 9 year old me flipped on the TV and wrestling was the name on the marquee. I had watched wrestling before and liked it, before the hour was up, I would love it. I saw two large bald men in red whipping the stuffing out of two small guys, both with a haircut I would soon adopt for myself. Over the course of the next hour, these large men that I soon found were a Russian and a Soviet sympathizer, beat these two young men within an inch of their lives. Every time one of the small guys would start to fight back, the big guy would shut him down. I hated those dang Russians for what they were doing. I should tell you dear reader; I said dang at the time, because anything more would find me with a bar of soap in my mouth. That’s just good parenting. Just when I thought all hope was lost and these guys with the awesome haircuts were doomed, a miracle happened. The blonde guy jumped on the Russian’s shoulders, rolled forward, and pinned the traitor! In that moment two things happened. 1- The Rock-n-Roll Express won their first NWA tag team championship and 2- I was hooked for life. Over the next few years I would beg for wrestling magazines, use my rental at the video store on wrestling tapes, and make sure at 6:05 every Saturday I was tuned into TBS. I would get fuming mad when The Horsemen jumped Dusty Rhodes in a parking lot. I believed in the power of Hulk-A-Mania. They were not heels and baby faces; they were good guys and bad guys. When Nikita Koloff “turned good” I lost my mind. When the Mega Powers exploded I hated Randy Savage for ruining a good thing. I was a fan when things were great; I was a fan through the TL Hopper years. I’m still a fan. In 1997 I decided the time was right for me to try my hand in the ring. I trained and wrestled for a few years. It was one of the greatest experiences of my life. I never made a dime and never wrestled anyone famous. Some would say I failed, I don’t think I did. How many people can say they got to live their dream? I say that to say this: we here at The Double Drop Kick Show are not Pro Wrestling Insiders. We are Pro Wrestling FANS! If you want insider news, you know where to find it. If you want to hear what was wrong with RAW, this is not the podcast for you. However, if you miss the Wrestling you grew up on, and you want to talk about it, The Double Drop Kick show is the show for you. Does this mean we’ll never discuss the current product? Absolutely not, we’re wrestling fans. We just choose to focus on the good. We all know the divas match wasn’t good, do we need to talk about it? We hope you’ll join us.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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One thought on “Our Show

  1. Just listened to podcasts 150 & 152. First time listener – Enjoyed the shows. Happy to hear a podcast out of Upstate SC on pro wrestling! Wasn’t sure if there was much of a scene anymore around the Upstate but I’m finding out a few folks like yourselves are still working. That’s awesome. I don’t know many wrasslin’ fans, most of my buddies don’t follow it anymore. I keep up with the current scene but it’s just not the same. I still enjoy some ’80s wrestling on the internet and WWE Network. I enjoy sharing that product with my kids more than I do today’s product, that’s for sure. Talking about the good ole days is still fun though! I plan to go back and listen to some older episodes and subscribe for future ones. Thanks for doing what you guys do!